You Don’t Need to Take a Leap of Faith

While no one knows the exact origin of the phrase “leap of faith,” it was popularized by 19th-century Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard. It means that there is a point where we no longer have the evidence on which to step, so we jump out into the unknown. The phrase has become a popular part of modern thinking, especially of those who follow Jesus.

The problem with this concept is that there is no Biblical foundation on which to establish it. None of the people found on the pages of scripture are described as “leaping” in their faith. Instead, the life of a believer is characterized by the metaphor of walking. We walk with God, in the light, in the way of love and by the Spirit. There is no instruction for us to get a running start before we leap out in the darkness, hoping to find God. The way of a Christian is to keep taking steps forward with God day by day.

This means that some days we will need to pause and rest as we prepare for the next step of the journey. Other days we will take many steps as God moves us at a brisk pace. There will be seasons of slow progress as we take deliberate steps. There will be others where we stretch our legs over significant strides in the right direction. We truly never know what each day, week, or season might hold as we walk with God.

I am convinced that this week God is not going to ask you to leap into the unknown for him. Rather you are going to feel his nudge to take a step forward as you trust his guidance. He will lead you one step at a time as you trust him. Each one will require you to rely on him, but he is there holding your hand through the process, not watching you perform blindly for his amusement. The question is not, “Are you ready to take a leap of faith?” but “Are you taking the step God wants you to take today?”

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