The First Day of the Week

Women went to look for Jesus’ body on Sunday morning.  They had rested on the Sabbath, or Saturday, and rose early to go to the tomb.  Men would have been getting ready to go back to work and grind out another six days.  But something radical happened, Jesus rose from the dead, changing both humanity and religion forever. 

In the book of Acts, the early Church followed the story and decided to worship on the first day of the week as a congregation of believers (note – Acts 20:7). This was also influenced by the Jewish believers trying to hold onto the old law while following Jesus. Therefore, they could have a Sabbath on Saturday and then worship Jesus on Sunday. 

As the Church grew and expanded, so did their knowledge of God’s plan for his people.  They understood that Christianity did not require them to have a Sabbath.  People continued to worship on Sunday, and for a long time, they worked the rest of the time.

Fast forward several hundred years.  It wasn’t until the 1800’s that a movement came about to form the two-day weekend we have now.  Slowly the concept gained traction, and by the 1930’s it was adopted as a regular practice.  People then had a day for fun, followed by a day for worship and leisure before returning to work on Monday morning. 

Because of this transition in our culture, it is easy to think of Monday as the first day of the week.  It is, for many people, the first day of the workweek.  We must be cautious not to let this affect our view of Sunday as believers. 

Every Sunday morning, the Church gathers on the first day of the week.  Here we start our week by connecting with the resurrection of Jesus by the day, his cross by communion, and his community by our participation.  We remember a Jesus who died for us and rose again, and there is nothing that happens each week that will change that fact. That should motivate us to live for Jesus at work in the coming days. 

This Sunday morning, our Church, along with thousands of others, will join together in worship.  Let me encourage you to connect to one of them.  It is a great way to start your week. 

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